STATEHOOD PARK

The 20th century – the century of Slovenian statehood

1918

»People, rejoice,
the Slavs will rise!«

From Dr Karel Verstovšek’s speech at the declaration camp in Družmirje, 30 May 1918

1918 - Karel Vestovsek

Dr Karel Verstovšek (1871–1923), Slovenian politician and philologist, a Velenje native and one of the most recognizable Slovenian politicians of the upheaval period. As commissioner for education and worship, he was a member of the first Slovenian National Government in the State of SCS. As president of the National Council for Styria, he influenced the course of events in the battles for Slovenia’s northern border through his firm support and the promotion of Rudolf Maister to the rank of general.

In the tumultuous and bloody 20th century, which completely wiped out the old world in two great wars and laid the foundations of the modern world we live in, the Slovenian nation took the last three big steps of the almost two and a half millennia long and trial-filled path of transformation from an ethnic community to a nation. That path began with the arrival of the Slavic ancestors of Slovenes in the 6th century to the meeting point of the Alpine, Pannonian and coastal world, where they, on the rubble of the ancient world, tried to establish their first state formation through the still somewhat mystical Slavic tribal principalities of Karantania and Carniola. Despite the rapid loss of independence at the exposed junction of the Germanic, Romanic, and Slavic worlds, the Freising manuscripts established Slovenians as a nation as early as in the 10th century. Five centuries later, the father of Slovenian literature, Primož Trubar, called for awareness of the unity of the Slovenian cultural and linguistic space in his famous »Lubi Slouenci« (»Dear Slovenes«) speech.

It took another three centuries for Trubar’s appeal to come to fruition in the all-Slovenian national political program Zedinjena Slovenija (United Slovenia) and the raising of the Slovenian national flag in the Springtime of Nations, in the midst of the turbulent 19th century.

Even though in the following decades, the Slovenian national consciousness and with it the determination to (finally) solve the Slovenian national question gathered momentum, the real push came in the form of the 20th century and the great war it brought with it. The war, in which Slovenian people once more suffered and bled for a foreign monarch, finally laid bare the crumbling foundations of the Danubian monarchy, and offered Slovenians two paths of future development. The May Declaration, the related declaration movement, and the Corfu Declaration were the first real and clearly expressed intentions that the Slovenian nation would determine its own future. Time and external circumstances ultimately decided in favour of the latter declaration. In the throes of World War I, Slovenes, on the basis of self-determination, along with other South Slavic nations living within the disappearing Austro-Hungarian Empire, declared their own State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs. This was on October 29, 1918. The fragile and vulnerable state formation, not recognized by any outside forces and whose borders were unclear, only managed to hold on for 33 days. In the post-war confusion, in the midst of determining new borders and due to the misunderstanding of the situation and the lack of consideration for the »losers of the Great War« on the part of the victorious powers, its scope shrank fastest precisely in the areas where Slovenes lived. The London Agreement in the West and the German pressure in the North, which was stopped only by the decisive military action of General Rudolf Maister and his volunteers, the fighters for the northern border, pushed the newly established state into an increasingly difficult position and forced it to act quickly. As early as December 1, 1918, the state merged with the Kingdom of Serbia, joined only a few days earlier by the former Kingdom of Montenegro, into the new Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes. The fact that both kingdoms were on the winning side of the war significantly improved the international legal position of the new country and with it the Slovenes. Disappointment, however, followed in the next few years. The Treaty of Rapallo, the Carinthian Plebiscite in 1920 and the Vidovdan Constitution of the Kingdom of 1921 resulted in painful loss of an approximately one-third of the Slovenian ethnic territory. This was somewhat mitigated only by the return and reunification of Prekmurje Slovenes with their mother nation in 1919. But there was no definitive solution to the national question even for the Slovenes who remained within the borders of the newly formed Kingdom. The first constitution clearly expressed the centralist and unitarist tendencies of the Serbian dynasts towards the gradual merging of the South Slavic nations into one nation, present from the very beginning. The 6 January dictatorship of King Aleksandar I. Karađorđević, the renaming of the country as the Kingdom of Yugoslavia and the new constitution formally established Slovenes as just one of the three tribes making up the one Yugoslav nation.

Ena od znamk iz serije »verigarji« z motivom sužnja, ki trga verige, slovenskega slikarja Ivana Vavpotiča, simbolizira slovensko narodno osvoboditev izpod »tisočletnega jarma« tujih gospodarjev. Znamke »verigarji« so bile prve slovenske oziroma jugoslovanske znamke, so bile natisnjene v skupni nakladi kar okoli 180 milijonov a niso bile nikoli v prometu v nazivni izdajateljici Državi SHS saj so prišle v promet šele v začetku leta 1919, torej Kraljevini SHS. V uporabi so ostale do leta 1921.
One of the stamps from the series »verigarji« with the motif of a slave breaking chains, by Slovenian painter Ivan Vavpotič, symbolizes Slovenian national liberation from the thousand-year rule of their foreign masters. The »verigar« stamps were the first Slovenian or, rather, Yugoslav stamps. They were printed in total circulation of around 180 million, but were never sold in the issuing SHS State, as they only came into circulation at the beginning of 1919, i. e. in the Kingdom of SCS. They remained in use until 1921.

(Photo by an unknown author, Current Materials Collection (1019),
kept in the National Museum of Contemporary History of Slovenia)

1945

»We are but a million

a million dying among the dead

a blood-drained million

only but a million

a million souls suffering

but a million never conquered!

Not now and not ever!«

Karel Destovnik – Kajuh, Slovenska pesem

1945 - Karel Destovnik-Kajuh

Karel Destovnik – Kajuh (1922–1944), the greatest partisan poet, a Šoštanj native, a symbol of the indomitable rebellious spirit of the Slovenian nation in the years of its greatest trials.

(Photo: unknown author, Collection of liquid material (1019), kept by the Museum of Recent History of Slovenia).

The dictatorship of King Alexander I was merely a desperate attempt to resolve the political crisis in the country, the main cause of which was the inequality of the nations that lived in it. The dissolution of the parliament, the renaming of the country and the new administrative division of the country into territories that did not reflect national and historical borders only temporarily and seemingly suppressed national issues, among which the Croatian and Slovenian issues were especially pressing. The king’s sudden death, the result of an assassination set up by the Macedonian and Croatian Ustasha emigration operating in Italy, only deepened the crisis in the country, resulting in national tensions. The country was also under increasing threat from the outside, in the form of Fascism and Nazism spreading across Europe. To consolidate the state internally, Serbs reached an agreement with the Croats and in 1939 established the Banovina of Croatia, assigning to it great legislative autonomy, while Slovenes continued to live as a mere »tribe« in the Drava Banovina, which was completely subordinate to the unitary government in Belgrade.

The unsustainable political situation in the country was once again interrupted by war, just like a quarter of a century ago. On April 6, 1941, World War II, which by then had already captured most of Europe, dragged the Kingdom of Yugoslavia and, with it, Slovenes, into its vortex. Internally, a completely unstable and disunited country collapsed after only 11 days in the so-called April war. The short war was followed by the occupation and the dismemberment of the country, which was most thorough and brutal in the Drava banovina, or in the Slovenian ethnic area. Most Slovenes saw occupation as the return of the recent »centuries-old masters and oppressors«, which invoked in most of them the desire to actively resist the occupying forces. The indecisiveness of the previous political leaders was exploited by the then still small and politically insignificant Communist Party of Slovenia, which had been banned due to its revolutionary nature and had been operating illegally since 1921. Together with a few like-minded groups and individuals, the party founded the Liberation Front of the Slovenian Nation, or OF for short, as early as on the night of April 27, 1941, and called on all Slovenes, regardless of age, gender, political affiliation, and worldview, to a united and armed resistance against the occupying forces. In the summer of the same year, the first Slovene partisan troops were formed. Until the end of the war, they represented the core of the active armed resistance, and many Slovene men and women joined various passive forms of resistance from the very beginning of the war. The communist party, which had a lot of experience with illegal activities even before the war, quickly gained reputation and supporters among Slovenes in the following months and years of the war and gradually assumed complete power in the OF and the national liberation struggle of the Slovenian nation. This was finally confirmed by the Dolomite Declaration, which, at least indirectly, also indicated the future Slovenian political and state development. Such a course of events only deepened the divide between the two political sides, which soon became irreconcilable and eventually turned into a tragic civil war in a time of foreign occupation that was extremely dangerous for the Slovenian nation. Due to its intransigence, determination and courage, the importance and the symbolism of the Liberation Front among Slovenians continued to gain momentum. The OF soon assumed the position of the only legitimate political and military force of the Slovenian nation, which was indirectly, as part of the all-Yugoslav resistance movement, recognized by Western Allies at the Tehran Conference in December 1943. Although the Slovenian OF was in many ways self-contained throughout the war years and therefore somewhat different from the liberation movements of other Yugoslav nations, it remained closely connected to the central leadership of the liberation movement, while maintaining its unique national and state-building character. The final break with the unitary vision of Yugoslavia from the pre-war monarchy was the assembly of delegates of the Slovenian nation in Kočevje, or the so-called Kočevje Assembly, in early October 1943. The delegation elected at the assembly along with Croatian delegates reached a decision on the federal organization of Yugoslavia based on the right to self-determination and the voluntary entry of the former Yugoslav nations into a post-war state. This took place at the II. session of the Anti-Fascist Council of the National Liberation of Yugoslavia, the highest political body of the Yugoslav resistance movement. Based on the resolutions adopted at the II. meeting at the end of November 1943, the Slovenian committee elected in Kočevje met again in February 1944 in Črnomelj and renamed itself as the Slovenian National Liberation Committee, which until the end of the war functioned as the first Slovenian parliament, its presidency representing the beginning of government. Formally, the Slovenian government, the National Government of Slovenia, also known as Ajdova government, was appointed in the last days of the war, on May 5, 1945, in Ajdovščina. With this, at least indirectly, the first Slovenian national state was declared.

Šoštanj, May 9, 1945. The day of victory! The red five-pointed star stood not only for victory – it also brought hope for a better and fairer future.

(Photo by Ivo Lipar, Current Materials Collection (L4/39),
kept in the National Museum of Contemporary History of Slovenia)

1991

»We were part of a historic moment,

able to help determine the course of Slovenia’s future. At the time, the majority of Slovenes were willing to sacrifice their lives for independence.«

Jože Prislan – Ervin, commander of the 89th Regional Headquarters of the Territorial Defense of Velenje

1991 - Joze Prislan

Jože Prislan – Ervin (1952–2002), commander of the 89th Regional Headquarters of the Territorial Defense of Velenje and one of the pillars and symbols of independence processes and the war for Slovenia in Šalek Valley.

On May 9, 1945, in Topolšica near Šoštanj, German Colonel General Alexander Löhr, commander of the German E Army, laid down his weapons before the »army of bandits«, as the Germans humiliatingly donned the partisans, and signed the unconditional capitulation of his units. With the surrender of the last occupying forces of Slovenian territory, the long-awaited freedom finally arrived for Slovenes and other Yugoslav nations. In May of 1945, the nation which the invader intended to destroy and erase from the political and ethnic map, proudly and confidently established itself as one of the anti-fascist nations who joined forces in an uncompromising struggle to defeat the greatest threat to humanity up to that point. Just as World War II fundamentally changed the world and laid new foundations, freedom brought entirely new political and social trajectories for life in the new country.

After the war, the Communist Party of Yugoslavia upheld the power of the people resting on the foundations laid during the war. Due to the international reputation it had acquired during the war and the broad support of the masses, it assumed full political and ideological power in the new country without much difficulty. This new, second, or the most commonly colloquiallly termed – Tito’s Yugoslavia changed its official name three times during its existence between 1945 and 1991. Although the federal structure of the country was emphasized in all three forms of the name, the political and social reality of post-war Yugoslavia was far from this declarative definition. This was, after all, a time when Slovenes got their own (national) parliament, (state) symbols and constitution. An important advance in the direction of the country’s federalization was the establishment of the Republic’s Territorial Defense (TO) at the end of the 1960s and the adoption of the Constitution of the SFRY in 1974, which also formally guaranteed each constituent nation the right to self-determination, including secession. Despite everything, throughout its existence, Yugoslavia remained an ossified, extremely bureaucratic, one-party state, transformed only slowly and with difficulty. It eventually lost touch with the rapidly changing developed world. When Josip Broz – Tito, the greatest moral authority and the most important pillar of the country, died in May 1980, the heterogeneous community of Yugoslav nations, under the weight of a severe economic crisis and the pressing economic, political, social and, last but not least, national issues that the crisis exposed, began to fall apart. Two camps formed. The Socialist Republic of Slovenia (soon joined by Croatia), the most developed and pro-Western oriented republic, sought models for further development primarily in the developed West. Market economy, political democracy, basic human rights and freedom of thought were the fundamental points of the pro-Western camp. On the other hand, Serbia, and Montenegro with federal authorities that both republics completely subordinated, saw the solution to the crisis in an even stronger consolidation of ranks around one party, greater control and interference of the state in the economy and the strengthening of federal authorities. Slovenia wanted as loose a confederation as possible, while Serbia strived for as uniform, strongly centralized and ideologically monolithic society and state as possible. Even though the Slovene-Serbian conflict within Yugoslavia was not about national disagreements, but mainly about the struggle between the two developmental models of Yugoslavia, the gap between the two sides only deepened and it became increasingly clear that a point of consensus would no longer be possible. In March 1987, the 57th issue of the Nova Revija magazine was published in Slovenia, representing a kind of an unofficial beginning of the Slovenian independence processes. In 1988 and 1989, the first opposition parties emerged in Slovenia. The parties summarized their political programs in the May Declaration, while the ruling Union of Communists of Slovenia also began to reform itself. When, on December 1, 1989, an attempt to organize a Serbian »Rally of Truth« was successfully prevented by the Slovenian militia (police) in Operation Sever (Operation North) in cooperation with the Slovenian Territorial Defense and with the approval of the Slovenian political leadership, the last attempt to discipline the rebellious republic failed miserably. In April 1990, the first post-war multi-party elections were held in Slovenia on the basis of constitutional amendments of the Parliament of the Republic of Slovenia to the 1974 Constitution. The united opposition DEMOS won the election. The new democratically elected government began to fulfill the promise for an independent Slovenia. Finally, all parties in the newly elected parliament unanimously decided that the citizens should decide the future of Slovenia themselves in a plebiscite on December 23, 1990. Based on results, which left no room for doubt, the Slovenian parliament adopted the Basic Constitutional Charter and the Declaration of Independence on June 25, 1991, based on which the president of the republic solemnly declared an independent and sovereign Slovenia the very next day. On June 27, and a day earlier in Primorska, the federal army left the barracks and finally fulfilled the years-long threats that, if necessary, they would prevent Slovenian independence by force. The war for the independent Slovenia began. After ten days of fierce fighting, during which the Slovenian nation once again displayed its determination and courage, and this time complete unity as well, the two sides finally negotiated and signed the Brioni Agreement. The Republic of Slovenia became fully sovereign on October 25, 1991, when the last member of the federal army left the country through the port of Koper. Due to numerous international recognitions that followed the development of events, the Republic of Slovenia was admitted into United Nations (UN) as the 176th member in May 1992. With this, in the stormy and bloody 20th century, the Slovenian nation took the last step on its century-long journey from an almost anonymous European national community to a fully-fledged and equal state-forming nation of the global international community.

The unveiling of the Slovenian national flag on June 12, 1991 (the new coat of arms and the state flag were unveiled on June 25), at the top of Triglav, the symbol of Slovenian identity, foretold the momentous changes awaiting the Slovenian nation.

(Photo by Joco Žnidaršič, the Joco Žnidaršič Fund,
kept in the National Museum of Contemporary History of Slovenia)

Vodeni ogled

Vodeni ogled za skupine traja približno eno uro.

Odpiralni časi in ceniki

Muzej Velenje na Velenjskem gradu

Odpiralni čas

Poletni odpiralni čas (od 1. aprila do 31. oktobra):

Odprto od torka do nedelje od 10h do 18h.
Ob ponedeljkih zaprto, razen v juliju in avgustu, ko je muzej tudi ob ponedeljkih odprt od 10h do 18h.

Zimski odpiralni čas (od 1. novembra do 31. marca):
Odprto od torka do nedelje od 10h do 17h.
Ob ponedeljkih zaprto.

Vstopnina

posamezniki
skupina – voden ogled do 6 oseb (cena po osebi)
skupina – voden ogled nad 6 oseb (cena po osebi)
odrasli
4,00 €
6,00 €
5,00 €
otroci, mladina, študentje, upokojenci
3,00 €
5,00 €
4,00 €
vsaka dodatna enota Muzeja Velenje – odrasli
2,00 €
4,00 €
3,00 €
vsaka dodatna enota Muzeja Velenje – otroci, mladina, študenti, upokojenci
1,00 €
3,00 €
2,00 €
občasne razstave ali ogled samo ene stalne razstave po izbiri – odrasli
2,00 €
/
/
občasne razstave ali ogled samo ene stalne razstave po izbiri – otroci, mladina, študenti, upokojenci
1,00 €
/
/
letna vstopnica + darilce – odrasli
30,00 €
/
/
letna vstopnica + darilce – otroci (vključeni tudi obiski Mladih muzealcev)
20,00 €
/
/
družinska vstopnica (do 2 odrasla)
10,00 €
/
/

Čakalna ura vodnika (do 30 minut brezplačno) – 5,00 €.

Popust:
Ponujamo vam cenovno ugodno skupno vstopnico z Muzejem Premogovništva Slovenije. 

Brezplačen vstop – predšolski otroci v spremstvu odraslih, spremljevalci skupin, vse skupine invalidov (razen delovnih invalidov) in njihovi spremljevalci, imetniki veljavnih muzejskih in nekaterih drugih izkaznic (ICOM, SMD, SED, PRESS) in brezposelni s potrdilom Zavoda za zaposlovanje.

Muzej usnjarstva na Slovenskem

Odpiralni čas

Poletni odpiralni čas (od 1. aprila do 31. oktobra):
Odprto od torka do nedelje od 9h do 17h.
Ob ponedeljkih zaprto.

Zimski odpiralni čas (od 1. novembra do 31. marca):
Odprto od torka do nedelje od 9h do 17h.
Ob ponedeljkih zaprto.

Vstopnina

posamezniki
skupina – voden ogled do 6 oseb (cena po osebi)
skupina – voden ogled nad 6 oseb (cena po osebi)
odrasli
4,00 €
6,00 €
5,00 €
otroci, mladina, študentje, upokojenci
3,00 €
5,00 €
4,00 €
vsaka dodatna enota Muzeja Velenje – odrasli
2,00 €
4,00 €
3,00 €
vsaka dodatna enota Muzeja Velenje – otroci, mladina. študenti, upokojenci
1,00 €
3,00 €
2,00 €
letna vstopnica + darilce – odrasli
30,00 €
/
/
letna vstopnica + darilce – otroci (vključeni tudi obiski Mladih muzealcev)
20,00 €
/
/
družinska vstopnica (do 2 odrasla)
10,00 €
/
/

Čakalna ura vodnika (do 30 minut brezplačno) – 5,00 €.

Popust:
Ponujamo vam cenovno ugodno skupno vstopnico z Muzejem Premogovništva Slovenije. 

Brezplačen vstop – predšolski otroci v spremstvu odraslih, spremljevalci skupin, vse skupine invalidov (razen delovnih invalidov) in njihovi spremljevalci, imetniki veljavnih muzejskih in nekaterih drugih izkaznic (ICOM, SMD, SED, PRESS) in brezposelni s potrdilom Zavoda za zaposlovanje.

Kavčnikova domačija

Odpiralni čas

od 1. julija do 31. avgusta, vsako nedeljo med 10. in 17. uro.
Za najavljene skupine odprto tudi po dogovoru.

Vstopnina

skupina – voden ogled do 6 oseb (cena po osebi)
skupina – voden ogled nad 6 oseb (cena po osebi)
odrasli
6,00 €
5,00 €
otroci, mladina, študenti, upokojenci
5,00 €
4,00 €

Čakalna ura vodnika (do 30 minut brezplačno) – 5,00 €.

Popust:
Ponujamo vam tudi cenovno ugodno skupno vstopnico z vsemi ostalimi enotami Muzeja Velenje in z Muzejem Premogovništva Slovenije.

Brezplačen vstop – predšolski otroci v spremstvu odraslih, spremljevalci skupin, vse skupine invalidov (razen delovnih invalidov) in njihovi spremljevalci, imetniki veljavnih muzejskih in nekaterih drugih izkaznic (ICOM, SMD, SED, PRESS) in brezposelni s potrdilom Zavoda za zaposlovanje.

Grilova domačija

Odpiralni čas

Od 1. julija do 31. avgusta, ob sobotah  med 10. in 17. uro. 

Za najavljene skupine odprto tudi po dogovoru.

Vstopnina

skupina – voden ogled do 6 oseb (cena po osebi)
skupina – voden ogled nad 6 oseb (cena po osebi)
odrasli
6,00 €
5,00 €
otroci, mladina, študenti, upokojenci
5,00 €
4,00 €

Čakalna ura vodnika (do 30 minut brezplačno) – 5,00 €.

Popust:
Ponujamo vam tudi cenovno ugodno skupno vstopnico z vsemi ostalimi enotami Muzeja Velenje in z Muzejem Premogovništva Slovenije.

Brezplačen vstop – predšolski otroci v spremstvu odraslih, spremljevalci skupin, vse skupine invalidov (razen delovnih invalidov) in njihovi spremljevalci, imetniki veljavnih muzejskih in nekaterih drugih izkaznic (ICOM, SMD, SED, PRESS) in brezposelni s potrdilom Zavoda za zaposlovanje.

Hiša mineralov

Odpiralni čas

Poletni odpiralni čas (od 1. aprila do 31. oktobra):

Odprto od torka do nedelje od 10h do 18h.

Zimski odpiralni čas (od 1. novembra do 31. marca):
Odprto od torka do nedelje od 10h do 17h.
Ob ponedeljkih zaprto.

Vstopnina

skupina – voden ogled do 6 oseb (cena po osebi)
skupina – voden ogled nad 6 oseb (cena po osebi)
odrasli
6,00 €
5,00 €
otroci, mladina, študenti, upokojenci
5,00 €
4,00 €

Čakalna ura vodnika (do 30 minut brezplačno) – 5,00 €.

Popust:
Ponujamo vam tudi cenovno ugodno skupno vstopnico z vsemi ostalimi enotami Muzeja Velenje in z Muzejem Premogovništva Slovenije.

Brezplačen vstop – predšolski otroci v spremstvu odraslih, spremljevalci skupin, vse skupine invalidov (razen delovnih invalidov) in njihovi spremljevalci, imetniki veljavnih muzejskih in nekaterih drugih izkaznic (ICOM, SMD, SED, PRESS) in brezposelni s potrdilom Zavoda za zaposlovanje.

Spominski park XIV. divizija

Odpiralni čas

Spominsko sobo si lahko brezplačno ogledate vse dni v letu.

Obiskovalci lahko ključ spominske sobe dobijo na:

Domačija Štumpfel
Plešivec 62
GSM: 041-983-424 (Branka Štumpfel)  ali tel.: 03 589 3849 (povezava do zemljevida) ali se za obisk dogovorijo preko e-pošte: natalija.stumpfel@gmail.com.

Za skupine se za obisk lahko dogovorite tudi z Muzejem Velenje na tel.: 03-898-26-30 ali po e-pošti: info@muzej-velenje.si.

Vstopnina

skupina – voden ogled do 6 oseb (cena po osebi)
skupina – voden ogled nad 6 oseb (cena po osebi)
odrasli
6,00 €
5,00 €
otroci, mladina, študenti, upokojenci
5,00 €
4,00 €

Čakalna ura vodnika (do 30 minut brezplačno) – 5,00 €.

Popust:

Ponujamo vam tudi cenovno ugodno skupno vstopnico z vsemi ostalimi enotami Muzeja Velenje in z Muzejem Premogovništva Slovenije.

Brezplačen vstop – predšolski otroci v spremstvu odraslih, spremljevalci skupin, imetniki veljavnih muzejskih in nekaterih drugih izkaznic (ICOM, SMD, SED, PRESS) in brezposelni s potrdilom Zavoda za zaposlovanje.

Galerija F-bunker

Odpiralni čas

Ponedeljek 19:00 – 21:00
torek 19:00 – 21:00
sreda 9:00 – 11:00
četrtek 19:00 – 21:00
petek 19:00 – 21:00
sobota 9:00 – 11:00
Ob nedeljah in praznikih je galerija zaprta.
Za najavljene obiskovalce je Galerija F-bunker odprta po dogovoru.

Spominski center 1991

Odpiralni čas

Odprto za najavljene oglede.  Za ogled pokličite 03 898 26 30 ali pišite na E: info@muzej-velenje.si

Vstopnina

skupina – voden ogled do 6 oseb (cena po osebi)
skupina – voden ogled nad 6 oseb (cena po osebi)
odrasli
6,00 €
5,00 €
otroci, mladina, študenti, upokojenci
5,00 €
4,00 €

Čakalna ura vodnika (do 30 minut brezplačno) – 5,00 €.

Popust:

Ponujamo vam tudi cenovno ugodno skupno vstopnico z vsemi ostalimi enotami Muzeja Velenje in z Muzejem Premogovništva Slovenije.

Brezplačen vstop – predšolski otroci v spremstvu odraslih, spremljevalci skupin, imetniki veljavnih muzejskih in nekaterih drugih izkaznic (ICOM, SMD, SED, PRESS) in brezposelni s potrdilom Zavoda za zaposlovanje.

Spominska soba, "Topolšica 9. maj 1945"

Odpiralni čas

Spominsko sobo si lahko brezplačno ogledate vse dni v letu.

Za skupine se za obisk lahko dogovorite tudi z Muzejem Velenje na tel.: 03-898-26-30 ali po e-pošti: info@muzej-velenje.si.

Vstopnina

skupina – voden ogled do 6 oseb (cena po osebi)
skupina – voden ogled nad 6 oseb (cena po osebi)
odrasli
6,00 €
5,00 €
otroci, mladina, študenti, upokojenci
5,00 €
4,00 €

Čakalna ura vodnika (do 30 minut brezplačno) – 5,00 €.

Popust:

Ponujamo vam tudi cenovno ugodno skupno vstopnico z vsemi ostalimi enotami Muzeja Velenje in z Muzejem Premogovništva Slovenije.

Brezplačen vstop – predšolski otroci v spremstvu odraslih, spremljevalci skupin, imetniki veljavnih muzejskih in nekaterih drugih izkaznic (ICOM, SMD, SED, PRESS) in brezposelni s potrdilom Zavoda za zaposlovanje.

Grad Šalek

Grad Šalek je za obiskovalce brezplačno odprt vsako sredo in soboto od 9:00 do 17:00 ure. 

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